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Table 2 Violent behavior, homicide and psychopathology among general populations

From: Mental illness and violent behavior: the role of dissociation

Study Data source and timeframe N Homicide Severe assault Any violent crime Sexual assault Diagnoses represented in study (among only perpetrators when possible)
Coker et al. (2014) [12]a/b National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement, US (ages 13–17), 2001–2004, lifetime timeframe 10,123 N/A N/A 1.7%a/b (same % for both arrest record and self-report) N/A Conduct disorder (20.42%)
Substance use disorder (19.58%)
Mood disorder (12.51%)
ADHD (6.8%)
Oppositional defiant disorder (4.54%)
Intermittent explosive disorder (4.29%)
Eating disorder (3.43%)
PTSD (2.92%)
No diagnosis (0.37%)
Elbogen & Johnson (2009) [7]b National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), US, 2001–2003, lifetime timeframe 34,653 N/A 6.78% 17.68% Grouped w/severe violence Substance use disorder only (21.41%)
Mood disorder only (10.47%)
Mood disorder + substance abuse (8.94%)
Schizophrenia + substance abuse (0.46%)
Schizophrenia only (0.40%)
No diagnosis (58.32%)
Diagnoses represent total N, not just offenders
Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI)a Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program, FBI, 2014, US, 1 year 318.9 million .004% 0.23% 0.37% .03% N/A
Swanson et al. (1990) [11]b Epidemiological Catchment Area survey, National Institute of Mental Health, US, 1 year timeframe 10,059 N/A   3.66% N/A Substance use disorder (41.64%)
Anxiety disorders (20.13%)
Mood disorder (9.37%)
Schizophrenia/schizophreniform disorder (3.92%)
No diagnosis (44.5%)
  1. aArrests
  2. bSelf-report