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Funding available for article-processing charges in 2016

We are pleased to announce that BPDED has funding from the Dachverband Dialektisch Behaviorale Therapie (DDBT) to cover the article-processing charges (APCs) of all articles submitted in 2016. Submit your manuscript now! 

Society affiliations

Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation is the official journal of the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder (NEA.BPD) and the Dachverband Dialektisch Behaviorale Therapie (DDBT).

The National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder (NEA.BPD) is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization established in 2001 by four family members, two consumers and one mental health professional. An internationally recognized organization, NEA.BPD is dedicated to building lives for millions of people affected by borderline personality disorder (BPD). To find out more about the NEA.BPD, visit their website here.

Funding available for article-processing charges
We are pleased to announce that BPDED now has funding from the DDBT to cover the article-processing charges (APCs) of all articles. For further information on the DDBT, visit their website here 

Aims and scope

Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation provides a platform for researchers and clinicians interested in borderline personality disorder (BPD) as a currently highly challenging psychiatric disorder. Emotion dysregulation is at the core of BPD but also stands on its own as a major pathological component of the underlying neurobiology of various other psychiatric disorders. The journal focuses on the psychological, social and neurobiological aspects of emotion dysregulation as well as epidemiology, phenomenology, pathophysiology, treatment, neurobiology, genetics, and animal models of BPD. Contributions investigating the broad field of emotion regulation and dysregulation as well as related pathological mechanisms such as dysfunctional self-concepts and dysfunctional social interaction are welcomed, as are studies of novel treatments for BPD. In addition, the journal considers research into the frequent, co-occurring psychiatric disorders like Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, ADHD, depression, eating disorders, conduct disorders, drug abuse, and social phobia, if related to BPD.